LauraStar's Photos

Photo 21 of 21

My Shot Book

Photo by: LauraSt…

Photo 21 of 21

My Shot Book

CALLING PHOTOGRAPHERS! We are looking for a series of 3 photos that tell a story. Post 'em and then let me know! Not every photo comes out the way you hope it would (such as this one) That is why we are thinking about making a photo guide book for kids. What tips and tricks would you like to see?

Tags: photo, tips

Category: Random


Photos

Comments for this photo

sparklyrainbow
May 12, 2014

I'd like to know how to shoot really good macro shots! Also, some tricks I know are: 1) If you are taking a pic of an animal, always shoot the photo at eye level of your photo subject. 2) Don't always center your pics, sometimes it comes out better when the target isn't lined up perfectly. 3) Play around with shutter speed to adjust the exposure of your photos

The Epic Factor
May 12, 2014

Ooh, I'm gonna buy that book :) @sparklyrainbow: You are SO right!! Okay, back to me: I think the book should address how you should really hold you camera as still as it will go while taking a photo (which is not what happened in this photo); that tip is usually helpful to people who haven't got tripods and the like. Also, there's art in everything!! I notice in the Winter a lot of my photos were just brown, ugly, leafless trees. But I know that there's so many eyes out there that could see my ugly trees and there has to be SOMEONE who'll appreciate it. Plus, don't forget editing! Or SOOC :D

mavis1510
May 12, 2014

I just need lots of tips, I'm a beginner.

CB_oceanlover
May 12, 2014

I think in the book (great idea by the way) it would be great to see basic photography tips like the rule of thirds and other tips like the ones @sparklyrainbow mentioned. Also maybe something on focus (what lens to use) and how to take better care of your camera. I would love to see those kinds of things in the book :D

CB_oceanlover
May 12, 2014

Oh and a question, would the book be for kids that are just beginning photography or kids that have some experience?

Hellohappy
May 12, 2014

Hahaha you don't know how often that happens xD Great idea! My tips: Remember that a good camera is not always necessary, the true key is the photographer him/herself. The camera is the tool you operate through, but YOU are the artist who sees the moment and catches it. Also, not every photo is planned! A lot are happy accidents! When you run out of inspiration, go outside and you never know what you'll find. Even when it's raining you can go outside (until a parent starts shouting for you to get in :p). And make sure you enjoy it!!

CityOnAHill
May 13, 2014

Do you think you could give tips on how to take good pictures in low light? Awesome idea, by the way! =D

*✩Stαŗℓเgh†✮*
May 13, 2014

Tip: Instead of focusing on all the trees or patch of flowers, try focusing on one subject in the scene for a cool effect.

HeldInHisArms
May 13, 2014

Here is a quote I saw from an unknown writer: "I met someone on the street who said," ' Wow, you must have a great camera, these pictures are awesome!' " I went over to this person's house for supper, and the food was great so I said, " ' This supper is amazing, you must have a great stove!' " " So, in a nutshell, it's not the camera, it's the photographer.

luvabull123
May 13, 2014

I agree with all that was said up there, but I also think that you should do different sections for different kinds of photography. Like one for people, one for animals, one for landscapes, etc.

windycityballet
May 13, 2014

I would love to know how to take good pictures of wild animals, all of my bird pictures are hidden by branches, blurry, etc. Tip: try a different angle/perspective, then you can get some really cool shots!

iPic12
May 14, 2014

One really good tip that I always try to use - DON'T GIVE UP! That perfect shot is out there waiting for you. Take hundreds of pics if you need to, just don't stop until you get what you want. Photography is sort of like fishing - you have to be super-duper patient and sometimes you don't catch anything. But if you do, you feel soooo satisfied and pleased with yourself... I mean, come on. Who doesn't want to feel like that? :D

CityOnAHill
May 14, 2014

Oh, and completely non-relevant, but I heard from someone that MyShot will not be accepting any more facelesses starting July 1st...is it true? I'll feel rather silly if it's not, but just making sure...

APhotoADay
May 14, 2014

I don't know if this has already been said, but I think you should include that photographers should experiment with angles. If you take a photo of a page of a book looking straight at it, that isn't usually the BEST photograph. But if you take the photo from a funky angle, like almost parallel to the page and with the focus on one area, it can look AWESOME! :D Also, I don't know if you should include the rule of thirds. I mean, its a good idea, but is it really necessary? I never learned it, and I don't REALLY understand it, but I think photos are best taken however it works.

APhotoADay
May 14, 2014

Oh! And don't forget how much better photos can look with black and white and sepia :D Maybe a section on editing? Cropping, color adjustments, sharpening and blurring, saturation, contrast, and the EVER WONDERFUL BLACK AND WHITE AND SEPIA :D They really can be the best

Disha
May 15, 2014

What I have learnt is that ALWAYS carry your camera with yourself!! You don't know when you get to capture a very precious moment!! Second, as Held said Camera doesn't matter, what matters is your skills and your dedication!!! But the most important thing is fun!! More important is to love what you do!! Thirdly, never feel shy!! I have always noticed that people stares at you if they find you doing anything new!! Just IGNORE them, forget about them!! They will also forget you!! And lastly, be attentive and creative!!! Try and Try!!! Try your level best!! These all are the tips I can give!! :)

Disha
May 15, 2014

And one thing can anyone tell me how to take shots of birds??? :))) Thank you!!

TropicalSummer
May 15, 2014

I would like tips on flash photography as it is so tricky, especially off-camera flash! The photography books are usually filled with hard-to-understand jargon and it's not much use. I really want to make good use of the flash. Tips: 1) Get in up close and fill the frame with your subject. 2) Take an everyday object and turn it over, looking carefully. Think "how can I make it look unique and not mundane?" And there you have your shot.

LightPhonics
May 15, 2014

How to get away from just using the rules of thirds; go over some more complex composition tools like the fibionacci divisions, talk about the gestalt laws and how to use them, and when and why you use square crops.

Lomax
May 15, 2014

That sounds like a good idea. I would like to see a clear write up on the 'rule of thirds" with photos with grids as examples. Showing how to use it for different types of photos like scenes, people, macro shots, etc.

Geckoman
May 15, 2014

@mavis1510 you should take close ups and start off taking pictures of frogs, bugs and other animals that will run /fly/swim away when you get near them and take close ups of flowers and water because they can be very interesting.

luvabull123
May 15, 2014

Definitely the Rule of Thirds. And maybe explain exposure such as shutter speed, aperture, and ISO as they are very important elements in photography. And some of the basics of editing. Also that not every picture will turn out like you want it(especially the one above) and that someone will ALWAYS be better than you. Now down to the specifics. Landscape Rule 1) Keep your horizon straight. 2)Try using foreground interest or leading lines. 3)Try unique angles. 4) Get off the beaten path to get a picture of something new. 5) Be creative. Think outside the box.

luvabull123
May 15, 2014

(cont'd) That's all I have for now. I will definitely purchase the book once it comes out. I would love to have a photography book centered around kids!

pointless/pics
May 15, 2014

[you don't know what you are releasing by asking that] [i am a monster]

pointless/pics
May 15, 2014

1._______ 2. Always keep Rule #1 open in case you need a rule that precedes all others. 3. MAKE SURE THE HORIZON IS STRAIGHT FOREVER & ALWAYS 4. Things look better in focus.

nerdsaresoooocool
May 16, 2014

Put an action figure like a chess or army piece in front of a wall and then shine a flashlight on the figure. After you have done that, photograph the shadow projected onto the wall. I will upload some of my pictures that use that method. A request, can someone show me a substitute for macro, besides zooming in, because I really would like to take some macro pictures!

light&shadow
May 16, 2014

@pointless/pics >.>

youngphotograph57
May 16, 2014

@Disha...hehe sure...1) Take your pics form THE GROUND LEVEL. It gives the photo a professional look. 2) Off-center. 3) Consider the background. If it looks nice, add it to the picture. 4) Be patient. You will have to wait to get a great shot, so don't desesperate. I know what I'm talking about. There can be many rules for bird photography, you can follow them...or break them! Sometimes the best shot is one you took one day without thinking...But I have to say the truth, the best tip I can give to you is TO GET A LARGE LENS. ;D

State of Grace
May 16, 2014

I'd like some tips on night photography!! Like how to get really nice shots when it's dark out. . .and also some astronomy photography tips as well cause I wouldn't mind experimenting with that :D Thanks so much for this idea :)

KestrelGirl
May 17, 2014

Hey LauraStar, I have a question. My dad took this really cool picture of me, faceless. i would want to use it as my profile picture, but last time I uploaded a picture I din't take( I was new) the modertors found out and got rid of it. As long as I don't take credit for my dad's picture, can I use it as my profile picture?

Hellohappy
May 17, 2014

There should also be a glossary with photography vocab and slang ;P And ideas for places to take photos or get inspiration. (e.g. amusement parks, beaches, restaurants, etc.) Even though photography is based upon the artist and not the camera, there should still be some camera suggestions (like "Which Camera is Best for You?" because I'd like to know which camera fits my "style") and editing projects (especially light experiments!). :)

The Epic Factor
May 18, 2014

@nerdsaresocool: That sound really cool, actually! I love all this inspiration, people!

Lulumoon
May 18, 2014

I think the book is a really good idea!!! I don't really have tips, just that everybody has their own way and taste in photography, so some people might have a completely different style. I would really like to have some tips in lighting, the rule of thirds, effects, angle and perspective, and focus.

Candydragon
May 18, 2014

I would like to know how good an old Kodak camera is. Mine is good, but keeps giving me a blurry shot, no matter how focused it looks! :(

ℙsycℌ_ℱlashpoin☂
May 19, 2014

1) Choose a subject to Focus on 2) Don't get in the way of the Light on the Subject (It make's it Way darker) 3) Have patience (Or your photo might turn out Blurry or Unfocused) 4) For macro shot's eather Back up and zoom in or get close and zoom out, And turn on Macro mode (If your camera has it) 5) Make sure not to get your hair/finger/ETC in front of the Len's, 6) Take photos of EVERYTHING! You might like how some of them Turn out 7) Have fun and Keep practicing! You'll get Even better! And can anyone give me some tips on Night photos and Motion photos? I want the Subject to be Unblurry

ℙsycℌ_ℱlashpoin☂
May 19, 2014

@Nerdsaresoooocool: Just Turn on Macro, Get close enough, But make sure your not super close, Some camera's just can do Super close, And snap the photo, It's hard, But you'll get a Hang of it, And Make sure not to shake, And if your taking Photos of Flowers/Plants Make sure the wind isn't to strong on the Subject will move tons, Hope this helped! Please check out my photos! -Psych_Flashpoint/FlippenPhotograph

pointless/pics
May 19, 2014

@StateOfGrace git yo'self a tripod. also it's all about that #remoteshutterlyf3 (or if you're like me, the #selftimerlyf3). blue hour is gorgeous and the lighting and colors is 500x better than midnight-dark-lighting for most things.

bendaphotoer
May 20, 2014

i've taken a couple of pics like this before.check out my page though. there are some better ones there

KSPloverbassrock1
May 20, 2014

Here are my best tips for photography #1 when shooting sunset's (My fav kind of photos) make sure that there is lots of light in the pic and maybe a few clouds, #2 some times it make the photos look better when there color is changed (if you look at my recent photos you'll see what I mean) #3 try to photograph your everyday life it works really well! #4 HAVE FUN!!!!!! KSPloverbassrock1 :)

NatGeo
Kids Staff

LauraStar
May 20, 2014

@everyone -- the faceless rules have NOT changed one bit! Please pass this on. I repeat, the faceless rules remain the same; no full faces will be accepted. Hands covering faces, just eyes, and pics where less than 1/4 of the face is showing are generally OK. Everything, of course, is taken on a case by case basis. The moderators have the final word.

†God Rocks†
May 20, 2014

Hi LauraStar mabye you should take pics of things you love like (animals) or (sunsets) or(Bugs) just a idea btw this is a AWESOME pic :)

mkphotography
May 20, 2014

Tip #1 Play with the focus, try focusing on multiple things with in the same shot. You have x amt of photos of the same shot but they all look completely different. Tip # 2 F-Stop! I think this might be one of the best things to play with. Depending on how high or low you have it set, you can brighten or darken, you can also make water look like its moving or capture individual drops. Also take your camera EVERYWHERE. You never know where a awesome shot will pop up. Don't be afraid to stop to take a cool photo!

StripedTiger
May 21, 2014

I just have a couple of tips and a question. Tip 1: Sometimes a blurry picture looks even better than a clear one. Tip 2: for pictures of flowers, some flowers look even better after it has just rained or after you water them so you capture the water drops in your photo. Tip 3: Flowers look better in yellow light and sometimes they look richer with the flash on and sometimes they look richer with the flash off so experiment with both. How do you blur the background of a photo but keep the subject crisp and clear? Oh, and does anybody have any tips on how to take clear pictures of small things?

luvabull123
May 22, 2014

I've got some more! -Landscape 1) A clear sky doesn't always make the best picture! Overcast skies, a few clouds, or a thunderstorm all add either drama or peace, depending on the situation. 2)Try out long exposures! 3)Make sure your shot is clear (i.e. no fingers, gloves, etc. or other unwanted elements in the photograph) -General Photography: 1)Learn all you can! Read books, articles, and magazines and even take a class! 2)Don't be afraid of criticism! And even criticize yourself! It will only help you! 3)Go explore! There's so much nature and people around us! You don't need to travel to

luvabull123
May 22, 2014

(cont'd) take pictures! 4)You don't need the highest megapixel camera out there! You can even use a smartphone! 5)Don't clutter your shots! Simplify them by getting in close or shooting from a different angle! 6)Don't be embarrassed! Who cares what other people think? The result will be worth it ;). -Other: 1)Maybe there could be two books: one for beginners and one for more advanced photographers. Then the experienced ones don't have to read through the rule of thirds, exposure, etc.

luvabull123
May 22, 2014

Oh and maybe the book could have pictures taken by kids from MyShot!

luvabull123
May 22, 2014

@StripedTiger I don't agree with you about blurry pictures. The subject should be as sharp and crisp as possible. To blur the background depends on what type of camera you have. I'm not sure how to with a P&S, but with a DSLR you would stop down your aperture to the lowest you can get it. Macro shots also depend on your camera: for a P&S you should switch to macro mode and simply take a picture; for a DSLR you can use macro extension tubes, macro lens converters, or a macro lens.

CityOnAHill
May 23, 2014

Yes, I agree with @luvabull123; that's be pretty awesome. =)

sparklyrainbow
May 24, 2014

It would be really helpful if there was a list of what cameras are best for certain types of photography! Like A camera is great for macro and B camera is awesome for street photography!

youngphotograph57
May 25, 2014

Oh, @luvabull's idea is so cool! It would be awesome if there were some examples of pictures taken by kids... ;)

†God Rocks†
May 26, 2014

oh yah luvabull123 good idea

State of Grace
May 27, 2014

Oh and another idea (this kinda ties in with pointless/pics & HelloHappy) could you explain blue hour, golden hour and anymore "hours" :D

mkphotography
May 28, 2014

@State of Grace golden hour is about the hour right before sunset. It is just about one of the best times to take pictures.

loreydorey
May 29, 2014

Experiment. Adventure out in the backyard and photograph anything you find interesting. If it doesn't turn out well, no problem, that's why you can delete your photos. I've used this method and gotten some pictures which I really like. Also, get up early in the morning with the camera. Some of my best pictures were taken in the morning. Don't be embarrassed to take your camera everywhere with you. There have been many times when I wished I had my camera but didn't. From that I learned my lesson. I now take it almost everywhere, and it's totally worth it.

loreydorey
May 29, 2014

And here's a tip for photographing animals and people: Don't cut off any part of the subject's legs below the knee. This usually (note the word usually) makes the photos look a lot better.

loreydorey
May 29, 2014

Editing: Play around!! Find what you like. You can always undo it if you don't like it. Editing makes photos way better.

loreydorey
May 29, 2014

Maybe you could use some of these comments in the book.

loreydorey
May 29, 2014

Sorry I keep commenting, but random tips keep popping into my mind. Contrast: When your subject is a lighter color, put it against a dark surface, and vice versa. This isn't necessary, but it can make the picture interesting. The rule of thirds: In many situations, it's best to keep your subject off center in your photos. It also makes the photo interesting. Clutter: Remove all trash from your background before snapping your picture. Clutter distracts from the subject, plus it makes the photo look terrible.

loreydorey
May 29, 2014

Taking multiple photos:Take more photos than you think you need. Taking your photo, your hands may have been shaking, or your subject moving, causing the photo to be blurry. Don't leave your subject until you're sure you have at least one good picture. Black and white: Sometimes turning a photo black and white makes it look much better. If you don't like the color of your photo, simply change it to black and white. Sharpness: Sharpness is important! Sadly, you can't turn a blurry photo into a sharp one. It must be taken sharp. Use a tripod, or if you don't have one, place the camera on a chair

kittycatlover10
May 30, 2014

hi laurastar! I don't have any tips to share but I do have an idea that involves tips for my shot. what if my shot had a special day once every month where everyone who wanted to tried to find someone new on my shot that they have never seen pics from them before and commented, gave tips, etc. Not that people don't do that every day but just to make it special.(there are a lot of photographers who are really good that don't get any attention)

❀@rcherygirl07❀
May 30, 2014

Tip 1: Get the PhotoArt App if you don't really have a good editing program. Tip 2: Use editing when necessary. Trick: Experiment with your editing tools to see how it affects the pic.

Wheresmychocolate
June 01, 2014

Tips: 1) Don't always center your subject, place it on the left or right side according to the rule of threes. 2) If you're trying to get a picture of a silhouette or something. you can place your subject so that it's in front of the sunlight. 3) Don't always take pictures at eye levels. Don't be afraid to lay flat on your stomach for the perfect shot, or climb a tree to get closer. 4) Cameras really REALLY don't matter. I take most of my shots with my phone. 5) Take multiple shots of your subject, and change which side you take pictures of them. That way, you can just pick the shots you want!

Wheresmychocolate
June 01, 2014

Some of the other comments had stuff about ISO, and changing lenses, but there are a lot of aspiring photographers that don't have Canons or Nikons, etc. Maybe a section on tips if you're not using a DSLR camera, like a digital camera or smartphone.

kittycatlover10
June 08, 2014

Maybe a glossary too.

MBthePhotographer
June 10, 2014

100% sure I will buy this book. I also want to know how to take AWESOME+AMAZING photos with a digital camera. It would also be neat if you could put the people who suggested the tip username so we could get credit. : )

daffodil
June 10, 2014

This book idea is soooooo cool! What I always do is take 3 pictures in a row and delete the two worser (is that a word?) ones. Usually I have a pretty good photo left. I usually use my smartphone to take pictures because I always have it with me and I'm kind of klutzy so I don't like taking my Canon or my "real" cameras. I definitely am biased with phone brands and the quality of their cameras. But any camera works as long as your subject can stay still, for me at least. I don't know how to take pictures of really fast stuff like fish so I need help with that! ;-)

rainbowhamster
June 11, 2014

my tips are simple. first, hold the camera as still as possible. 2, if the photo is to messy, delete it and retake the pic. sometime the pic might be messy because the lens might be coverd with dirt or something else. you can buy camera clenser from a store.

Ramos
June 12, 2014

I think it should include the best sites and best ways to edit pictures. Also, how to shoot pictures that fit different themes- like happy pictures should be a little softer and brighter, gloomy pictures grainier and darker. And also it should include how to control certain elements in photographs- like exposure, grain, shadows, light, saturation, and so on.

JuJu34222
June 12, 2014

One I'm familiar with and I have gone through alot is accept failure. There are sometimes where you might have a great idea but you can't pull it together no matter what. Good luck on the photo guide!

Narrowgate
June 15, 2014

@CityOnAHill: Those are tricky, because a lot of times, you would want a tripod. You can widen the aperture, letting more light in, or make the shutter speed slower. But get creative with it. If yo udon't have a tripod, try using a chair, a table, the ground, whatever. And if it's of people, don't be afraid to take motion pics, where they are a blur...

QueenOfPhotos268
June 16, 2014

Tip... Photos of people don't always have to have a smile on their face. Doing something natural is just as good, too! ????

volleyballgirl1
June 16, 2014

I agree @luvabull123- there should be photos from myshot in it! also here are a few tips: 1)don't be scared to try a new type of picture, it might be amazing, but you won't know if you don't try 2) take many pictures of the same scene and choose the very best one 3) don't over edit becuase it can get grainy. I think the book should include how to control elements, like Ramos said.

volleyballgirl1
June 16, 2014

ooh! i just thought of this! I am wanting to be an interior designer. Doing that has actually helped me with art and photography! In interior design you learn to use color schemes. They can add a calming effect that is sometimes really nice in a photo. i think some color scheme tips should be added. examples: green can make a picture look more natural and clean, blue can look cold, red reminds people of action, heat and love; yellow is good for a bright picture; complimentary colors add tension sometimes; split complementary can take away that tension. split complementary is when you ...

volleyballgirl1
June 16, 2014

continued... take one color and use the two colors next to the one across from it on the color wheel; analogous can be calming or bright because you can use 3-5 colors that are next to eachother. so red, orange, and yellow can be used together to make a bright room or photo while violet, blue, and green can be calming and comfortable. monochromatic (one main color in different tints and shades) can let people focus on more than just the colors. The book should also talk about focal points. focal points can be created by using lines to point to something. example: a bed that is centered...

volleyballgirl1
June 16, 2014

...underneath a window and a lamp shines over it. a focal point can also be made by using a splash of color. such as when most things in a photo are dark colors and then there is a bright orange ball on a table. Focal points can make a very interesting photo.

volleyballgirl1
June 16, 2014

vertical stripes can make something look taller and horizontal stripes can make something look wider

volleyballgirl1
June 16, 2014

Experiment with lighting. Usually natural light looks better than lightbulbs. Also, experiment with times of day. An hour after the sun rises and an hour before the sun sets can create great pictures.

JuJu34222
June 16, 2014

@Olympia how did you find that out? And I really hope it's true cause it will be nice to be able to put my face in photos.

luvabull123
June 16, 2014

There are many rules for photography, but rules are meant to be broken. Experiment with composition, lighting, etc. and just go with the flow.

CityOnAHill
June 18, 2014

Thanks, @Narrowgate, and sorry I didn't see that a lot sooner. I'll be keeping those tips in mind.

MusicMaster
August 12, 2014

I hope no one has already said this, but when u take photos of the moon, always use flash. :) hope that's a good tip and I'm not 2 late 2 say it!

NatGeo
Kids Staff

LauraStar
August 18, 2014

Calling all photographers who use an iPhone! Post here to let me know who you are and if you are willing to show off your pics.

11Six
September 06, 2014

Camera settings, and the best kind of cameras would be nice.

11Six
September 06, 2014

I have used a iphone in some of my pictures. And sure, i will "show them off"

NatGeo
Kids Staff

LauraStar
October 30, 2014

Here's another challenge: Capture HDR images on your camera or smartphone. Pick a place that has bright lighting and also dark shadows. Examples: a sunny street scene with building shadows, a sunset, or a path inside a park. Select the HDR function. Have your camera take two images (one lighter and one darker) It will create a third that is a composite of the two images. Upload all three images and let me know!

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